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Baja Eats: Baja Café

Baja Café makes sure “every person gets warm service at a fair price.”

August 16, 2016

Baja Eats

The new location for Baja Café is a little bit funky with a whole lotta flavor. The menu puts some creative sizzle into what we usually think of as breakfast.

At noon, the café is alive as happy customers hunched over plates dig into eggs benedicts. Baja Cafe offers flavor shake-ups on breakfast staples. Jennifer and I split an order of benedicts—one classic, one Coyote. The traditional comes with a toasted muffin and “seared spiral ham,” then a poached egg balanced on top, with a ladle of creamy hollandaise that tasted like a savory pudding—pure comfort food ($8.29).

The Benedicts: one traditional, one Coyote Eggs Benedict at Baja Café.

The Benedicts: one traditional, one Coyote Eggs Benedict at Baja Café.

The Coyote ($9.49) boasted a medium poached egg, then a sheet of Hatch green chiles, crisped jalapeno bacon, all topped with mouth-tingling house-made Chipotle hollandaise. It was a tasty wake up.

Because it’s our first visit, they delivered a free snickerdoodle pancake, spiced with sprinklings of cinnamon and brown sugar with a vanilla glaze. It was a fast sugar buzz even before our main event.

The Snickerdoodle Pancake at Baja Café.

The Snickerdoodle Pancake at Baja Café.

The Tomatillo Pork Pupusa is South American street food, popular in El Salvador. A carnival of layers, it’s made from cornmeal grilled into a tamale cake, smothered in pulled pork with caramelized onion, then a mixture of melted cheddar and queso fresco, topped with crisp bacon, a slash of sautéed spinach, poached eggs, and all polished off with hollandaise. It’s one plate of gastronomic ambition ($11.49).

Jennifer chose the popular Reuben. Baja’s rendition is a moist, hand-carved corned beef on two slices of Rye, melted cheese, tangy sauerkraut, and a smear of Thousand Island dressing, grilled ($11.29) without being drenched in grease.

The Ruben at Baja Café.

The Ruben at Baja Café.

Owner Gerard came and sat with us. I commented on the atmosphere. He looked around at the hanging spaceship ceiling architecture and the wall of black mirrored glass, smiled and said, “It has character.”

We talked about them opening this second location after celebrating two years of love at their eastside spot. He said, “We believe everyone works hard to make their dollar. People can choose to go anywhere, so we need to make sure every person gets warm service at a fair price.”

Baja Café's new location on Campbell has good food, good service, and plenty of character.

Baja Café’s new location on Campbell has good food, good service, and plenty of character.

Customers get that and then some. Eating here feels like an event. Ever since the glory of the egg has been rediscovered as a super food, breakfast has popped up throughout the entire day, no longer reserved for waking up. And Baja Café has figured out how to make them in recipes you’ve never considered. Don’t miss this place.

They use local Merit Foods as their distributor and serve local Yellow Brick Coffee, La Mesa Tortillas, and select items from local artisans.

Baja Café
2970 East Campbell
(Glenn and Campbell)
520.344.7369

Original location:
7002 E Broadway Blvd
520.495.4772

www.BajaCafeTucson.com
Hours: 6:00am – 2:00pm


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