Hungriest Foodie’s Chickpea Curry

This recipe comes from a culmination of recipes I have used over the years for Indian -style lentils. In this case I am using the black chickpea otherwise known as Bengal Gram. It is a wilder cousin of the chickpea we are familiar with. I mentioned this is my Hungriest Foodie column from the May/June […]

May 13, 2015

Recipes

This recipe comes from a culmination of recipes I have used over the years for Indian -style lentils. In this case I am using the black chickpea otherwise known as Bengal Gram. It is a wilder cousin of the chickpea we are familiar with. I mentioned this is my Hungriest Foodie column from the May/June 2015 issue of Edible Baja Arizona. If you are interested in learning how to grow your own chickpeas, I wrote about growing them last year.

Hungriest Foodie's Chickpea Curry
Print Recipe
Indian -style lentil curry, as mentioned in the May/June 2015 issue of Edible Baja Arizona magazine.
Servings Prep Time
4-6 people 10 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30 minutes At least 5 hours
Servings Prep Time
4-6 people 10 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30 minutes At least 5 hours
Hungriest Foodie's Chickpea Curry
Print Recipe
Indian -style lentil curry, as mentioned in the May/June 2015 issue of Edible Baja Arizona magazine.
Servings Prep Time
4-6 people 10 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30 minutes At least 5 hours
Servings Prep Time
4-6 people 10 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30 minutes At least 5 hours
Ingredients
Chickpea Ingredients
Sauce Ingredients
Servings: people
Instructions
Cooking the Chickpeas
  1. I start off by soaking the chickpeas in a solution of water and sodium bicarbonate otherwise known as baking soda, overnight. Use about double the water with a large pinch of baking soda. This helps soften up the chickpeas and starts a sprouting process. They won’t totally sprout, but the chemical process that is started within the seed is gearing it up to sprout. We take advantage of this chemical process to make them easier to cook and digest.
  2. After seeds have been soaked overnight, or during the day (at least 5 hours), drain water, rinse chickpeas, and add to your pressure cooker with about double the amount of water, cardamom pods, a cinnamon stick, and bay leaf. Optionally, you can also add in a few chili peppers to taste for a kick.
  3. If you have not used a pressure cooker before, please consult instructions. Start burner on high until water is boiling and cooker is hissing. Then turn to lowest setting and cook the chickpeas for about 20-30 minutes--basically until they are soft and you can smash them easily with your fingers. When they are done, drain enough water that there isn’t more than enough to cover the chickpeas. Don’t drain all the water. Remove the bay leaf, cardamom and cinnamon stick.
Making the Curry Sauce
  1. Take a can of whole, canned tomatoes and cut up into small pieces. You don’t have to be too thorough, the tomatoes will cook down. Set aside.
  2. While the chickpeas are cooking, take an iron skillet with some coconut oil and a dash or two of toasted sesame oil and heat up on medium high. Add in the cumin seeds, black peppercorns and mustard seed. Cook until they start to crackle or get dark brown.
  3. Add the curry, paprika and coriander and toast, stirring quickly. If oil is sucked up, add a little bit more. The house will start to smell amazing about now.
  4. Add in onions, garlic and a little bit more oil so that you can cook the onions until translucent.
  5. Add in tomatoes, salt and asafoetida, turn down heat to low and simmer for about 10 minutes.
  6. Once the sauce is cooked add it to the chickpeas in the pressure cooker and cook on low heat with lid on for about another 5 minutes.
  7. Eat as is, or add a blob of yogurt, sour cream or Crème fraîche in the middle of the bowl.
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