No categories

Trees for Sky Islands

On May 1, in partnership with Trees for Tucson, students at Sky Islands High School planted 29 trees on their school grounds, part of their effort to start an edible forest at the former Rogers Elementary School.

May 13, 2014

Photography by Sky Islands students Brianna Giordano and Vincent Potter. Text by art teacher Jason Marrano.

On May 1, in partnership with Trees for Tucson, students at Sky Islands High School planted 29 trees on their school grounds as part of an effort to start an edible forest at the school, which is located on 12 acres of land on the east side of Tucson, at the former Rogers Elementary School. Students planted ironwood, velvet mesquite, screwbean, honey mesquite, blue palo verde, and hackberry. “This is the first part of what we hope to be a community orchard, bringing food trees to the urban environment,” says Sky Islands’ director Shari Popen.

A student crew led by teacher, Michael Bagesse, prepares a passive water harvesting basin with the help from The Fairfax Companies and backhoe operator, Dwain. Throughout the day, the students got lessons about planting native trees from the permaculture teacher, Dan Dorsey. Above: Noah Jeppson transports a Celtis reticulata, or canyon hackberry, which will help to attract over 30 species of birds to the school.

A student crew led by teacher, Michael Bagesse, prepares a passive water harvesting basin with the help from The Fairfax Companies and backhoe operator, Dwain. Throughout the day, the students got lessons about planting native trees from the permaculture teacher, Dan Dorsey. Above: Noah Jeppson transports a Celtis reticulata, or canyon hackberry, which will help to attract over 30 species of birds to the school.

Students carry a small canyon hackberry tree and honey mesquite to their intended locations with assistance from science teacher, Lukas Bogard.

Students carry a small canyon hackberry tree and honey mesquite to their intended locations with assistance from science teacher, Lukas Bogard.

Savannah Dirks poses with her Prosopis pubescens, commonly called a screwbean mesquite.

Savannah Dirks poses with her Prosopis pubescens, commonly called a screwbean mesquite.

Tyler Smith and Kayla Dimenstein prepare a bed for a honey mesquite tree.

Tyler Smith and Kayla Dimenstein prepare a bed for a honey mesquite tree.

 

Nick Forgach pauses from his hard work to study a female marine blue butterfly.

Nick Forgach pauses from his hard work to study a female marine blue butterfly.

Luciana Thum delivers needed topsoil to the newly planted trees.

Luciana Thum delivers needed topsoil to the newly planted trees.

Emma Waddell applies topsoil around a Screwbean Mesquite, which the students will use the seed pods of to make a sweet flour for future ethnobotanical cooking lessons.

Emma Waddell applies topsoil around a Screwbean Mesquite, which the students will use the seed pods of to make a sweet flour for future ethnobotanical cooking lessons.

Anthony Gonzales and Malik Arceneaux enjoy the fruits of their labor with teacher, Michael Bagesse, while student, Klairisa Lujan, waters a newly planted ironwood tree, a keystone tree that will provide numerous functions in the rehabilitation of the the Rogers Commons.

Anthony Gonzales and Malik Arceneaux enjoy the fruits of their labor with teacher, Michael Bagesse, while student, Klairisa Lujan, waters a newly planted ironwood tree, a keystone tree that will provide numerous functions in the rehabilitation of the the Rogers Commons.

The students pose for a celebratory group photo after a hard day’s work of planting of 30 trees.

The students pose for a celebratory group photo after a hard day’s work of planting of 30 trees.

 

The trees were provided by the Trees for Tucson energy–efficient shade trees program. Rosey Koberlein, the CEO of Long Realty, Inc. helped to fund the tree project. Jason Tankersley, the CEO of The Fairfax Companies, supplied the essential tools of backhoe and driver.


Tags: , ,




Previous Post

Bringing Back the Mesquite

Next Post

Dream Renewed